Archive for the ‘Balance’ Category

posted by on Acupuncture, Balance, Elements, Healing

Karns, who has a gentle, counselor-like demeanor that put me at ease, integrates Five Element (“5E”) acupuncacu2ture and traditional Chinese medicine to help address acute pain or other symptoms and bring clients closer to their optimal health. The five elements are earth, metal, water, wood and dire, and each has a unique set of strengths and potential challenges. “In 5 Elements, it’s thought that at some point in birth or childhood, we develop a constitutional weakness in one of the five elements, and that weakness is the true cause of all our illnesses,” say Karns […] “By directly treating that particular element, we’re treating the root of the problem and thus all presenting symptoms will fade away.”

Karns specializes in women’s health and fertility, through she regularly works with men and women in all stages of life.

My first appointment started with an hour-long consultation, during which Karns asked me questions that ranged from my daily eating habits […] to childhood memories […]

I was rather shocked to feel, or more accurately, not feel, most of the needles as they went into my skin. I felt a slight pressure, but no the actual “stick” I expected. Draining toxings from the body through crefully placed needles arnd employing a technique called moxibustion are key components of the 5E practice. Moxibustion involves placing a gragrant herb called Artemesia vulgaris on a key point on the body and setting a spark to it, leeting it smoke just to the point of warmth before removing. The treatment is designed to warm and tone targeted organs, allowing them to operate more optimally. […]

“When we heal the root cause of our illness, we are able to manifest our full potential,” Karns says summing her philosophy. “And, expressing our fullest potential is true health.”

Read the full article in Simply Buckhead May/June 2013.
Story: Jennifer Bradly Franklin

Interested?

Schedule an appointment today.

 

 

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posted by on Balance, Energy, Featured, Nutrition, Seasons, Uncategorized

pumpkin soup

Like a squirrel piling up acorns in a tree, our bodies are looking to store up energy and health this fall in preparation for the chill of winter. The best way to take care of that natural increased appetite is with warming, nutritious foods.

According to Paul Pitchford’s great book, Healing With Whole Foods, well-chosen

foods can be used to offset the dryness of fall, which can bring dryness of the skin, nose, lips and throat. In addition, warming foods stimulate all the body’s functions, helping us warm up from the inside out.

Warming food include:

  • Almonds
  • Blackberries
  • Chocolate
  • Chicken
  • Eggs
  • Figs
  • Greens
  • Honey
  • Oats
  • Onion
  • Oranges
  • Parsnips
  • Pears
  • Pinenuts
  • Pumpkin
  • Radishes
  • Root vegetables
  • Red beans
  • Roasted foods
  • Root vegetables
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Spinach
  • Tomatoes (cooked)
  • Turnips

Hearty and Healthy Fall Recipes

Pumpkin Soup from about.com

Vegetarian pumpkin soup is warming and filling. Perfect for the holidays or any time.

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon margarine
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 16 oz can of pumpkin puree
  • 1 1/3 cups vegetable broth
  • 3 cups soy milk
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

In a large saucepan, cook the onion in the margarine for 3-5 minutes, until onion turns clear. Add remaining ingredients, stirring to combine. Cook over medium heat for another 10-15 minutes. Enjoy!
Makes 4 servings of vegetarian pumpkin soup.

Roasted Root Vegetables from dr.weil.com

“Root vegetables (with the exception of potatoes and carrots) are some of the most overlooked and underappreciated foodstuffs around. But these nutritional storehouses are hidden treasures worthy of your notice. Not only are they available in winter when other vegetables are hard to find, but they are also very inexpensive. Experiment with turnips, rutabagas, beets and parsnips, and learn what they have to offer in taste and versatility. Rutabaga (also known as swede) is an accidental vegetable — the result of a chance hybridization of turnips and cabbage. Like carrots, they’re low in sodium and high in vitamin C. The flavor of all root vegetables will be enhanced by selecting fresh, firm produce (preferably organically grown) and storing it carefully. Turnips and potatoes should be stored in a cool, dark place out of the refrigerator. The rest of these roots will keep well in the refrigerator for at least a week.”

Ingredients:
2 pounds root vegetables (use potatoes, carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, beets), peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 medium onion, peeled and cut into 1/3-inch wedges
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
Salt to taste
1 head garlic, separated into cloves and peeled
Chopped fresh herbs like rosemary, or balsamic vinegar (optional)

Instructions:
1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Place the root vegetables and onion in a roasting pan.
2. Toss the vegetables with the olive oil and salt to taste. Do not crowd the vegetables.
3. Roast the mixture for a total of 45-50 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. After 30 minutes, scatter the garlic cloves in with the vegetables. Continue stirring every 15 minutes until the vegetables are tender and evenly browned.
4. Before serving, add a sprinkling of fresh chopped herbs or balsamic vinegar, if you like for additional flavor.

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posted by on Balance, Elements, Energy, Heart, Mental Clarity, Seasons, Stress

Over the past couple of weeks, you may have felt the weather shift. We’ve come into the time of late summer—after the peak of summer, but before the leaves of autumn fall.

According to Angela and John Hicks, co-founders of the College of Integrated Chinese Medicine, this is a time of remarkable balance: “What is most striking about this season is the sense of time standing still. The peak of yang is over and the days are getting shorter but the leaves are still on the trees and the weather can still be warm. The melancholia of autumn is yet to begin. It is a time when yin and yang are finely balanced.”

In the natural cycle of the five elements, Earth acts as our provider, our mother. It’s the soil that nourishes the plants, which in turn nourish us. Earth is our center, the root, which supports all of the other elements. Now is the time of harvest, the act of giving and receiving—reciprocity in the truest sense.“The fields are filled with nourishment representing the fruits of our labors. … it yields an abundant harvest to those who adequately cultivate and care for it.”Lonny S. Jarrett We should take a few moments every day to give thanks for an abundant harvest.

In our lives, a balanced presentation of the Earth element is someone who is not only able to work hard, but also able to reap the benefits of his or her efforts. It’s being able to feel satisfied and “nourished” by our accomplishments and relationships. Can you support others without being smothering or feeling resentful? Are you able to ask for help when you need it? If someone offers you help, do you accept it or push them away? Most importantly though, the Earth element is about being centered, stable, and “home.” Earth has the comfort and security you feel when you go home. On the contrary, if the Earth element is out of balance, we may feel mentally foggy or distracted, ungrounded, unsupported, lethargic, “heavy,” or worried (the kind of worrying or ruminating that’s super unproductive—like a hamster wheel spinning the same thought over and over).

“Madness is to think of too many things too fast, or of one thing exclusively.” – Voltaire

In accordance with the season of late summer, ask yourself:

Are you satisfied with what you have cultivated and ‘harvested’ in your life, or are you always hungry for more?

Where do you get your emotional support? Do you have someone you can turn to if you need help?  Do you feel like your relationships have a reciprocal nature of giving and receiving?

What nourishes you? Where is “home?” Where have you put down roots? How would you describe the feeling of “going home?”

What grounds you when you feel uncentered? What motivates you when you feel stuck?

Remember, now is the season to give thanks for all that you receive. Take a moment to reflect on what nourishes you on a day-to-day basis—physically, emotionally and spiritually.

 

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posted by on Balance, Heart, Mental Clarity, Qi Gong, Stress

Acupuncture Atlanta

Stress can be a very sneaky, insidious thing. It waits silently in the background, showing no signs of the destruction it carries with it, while we work, pushing to get everything done in our daily lives. Even when we don’t think we’re letting stress affect us, it can accumulate in our muscles, energy and mind. Before you know it, you’re battling a migraine, backache, chronically troubling thoughts, etc.

It’s impossible to avoid stress in life, but it is possible to live with more peace, less pain and more balance by tuning in and staying in touch with the signals being sent all the time between the body, mind and heart.

One of our friends and partners, India Powell of Lightswitch Communications, has put together an online workshop designed to help you take better care of yourself and be more in tune with your own stress signals. Through the workshop, called Burnout to Balance, you can explore at your own pace seven steps for moving away from stress and toward more bliss in everyday life, and you’ll build your own a complete action plan for better self-care. It’s also full of local resources, recommended reading and other tools to help you on your journey.

Make sure you find time to do something today—however small—to care for yourself.

 

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