Posts Tagged ‘energy’

posted by on Balance, Energy, Featured, Nutrition, Seasons, Uncategorized

pumpkin soup

Like a squirrel piling up acorns in a tree, our bodies are looking to store up energy and health this fall in preparation for the chill of winter. The best way to take care of that natural increased appetite is with warming, nutritious foods.

According to Paul Pitchford’s great book, Healing With Whole Foods, well-chosen

foods can be used to offset the dryness of fall, which can bring dryness of the skin, nose, lips and throat. In addition, warming foods stimulate all the body’s functions, helping us warm up from the inside out.

Warming food include:

  • Almonds
  • Blackberries
  • Chocolate
  • Chicken
  • Eggs
  • Figs
  • Greens
  • Honey
  • Oats
  • Onion
  • Oranges
  • Parsnips
  • Pears
  • Pinenuts
  • Pumpkin
  • Radishes
  • Root vegetables
  • Red beans
  • Roasted foods
  • Root vegetables
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Spinach
  • Tomatoes (cooked)
  • Turnips

Hearty and Healthy Fall Recipes

Pumpkin Soup from about.com

Vegetarian pumpkin soup is warming and filling. Perfect for the holidays or any time.

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon margarine
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 16 oz can of pumpkin puree
  • 1 1/3 cups vegetable broth
  • 3 cups soy milk
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

In a large saucepan, cook the onion in the margarine for 3-5 minutes, until onion turns clear. Add remaining ingredients, stirring to combine. Cook over medium heat for another 10-15 minutes. Enjoy!
Makes 4 servings of vegetarian pumpkin soup.

Roasted Root Vegetables from dr.weil.com

“Root vegetables (with the exception of potatoes and carrots) are some of the most overlooked and underappreciated foodstuffs around. But these nutritional storehouses are hidden treasures worthy of your notice. Not only are they available in winter when other vegetables are hard to find, but they are also very inexpensive. Experiment with turnips, rutabagas, beets and parsnips, and learn what they have to offer in taste and versatility. Rutabaga (also known as swede) is an accidental vegetable — the result of a chance hybridization of turnips and cabbage. Like carrots, they’re low in sodium and high in vitamin C. The flavor of all root vegetables will be enhanced by selecting fresh, firm produce (preferably organically grown) and storing it carefully. Turnips and potatoes should be stored in a cool, dark place out of the refrigerator. The rest of these roots will keep well in the refrigerator for at least a week.”

Ingredients:
2 pounds root vegetables (use potatoes, carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, beets), peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 medium onion, peeled and cut into 1/3-inch wedges
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
Salt to taste
1 head garlic, separated into cloves and peeled
Chopped fresh herbs like rosemary, or balsamic vinegar (optional)

Instructions:
1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Place the root vegetables and onion in a roasting pan.
2. Toss the vegetables with the olive oil and salt to taste. Do not crowd the vegetables.
3. Roast the mixture for a total of 45-50 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. After 30 minutes, scatter the garlic cloves in with the vegetables. Continue stirring every 15 minutes until the vegetables are tender and evenly browned.
4. Before serving, add a sprinkling of fresh chopped herbs or balsamic vinegar, if you like for additional flavor.

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posted by on Balance, Elements, Featured, Seasons

Acupuncture Atlanta

I had the opportunity recently to visit beautiful Colombia, and during the trip I was reminded once again of the value of generosity. I witnessed and experienced such incredible patience, conscientiousness and giving to others as I got to know the Colombian people.

Unfortunately, my trip home was unusually challenging and exhausting, fraught with flight troubles. While it could have turned into a nightmare, my journey continued to be filled with amazing, generous people—and that made all the difference in the world.

I ran across some thought-provoking words about the importance of generosity from a Buddhist perspective at Learning to Give, which is devoted to teaching giving and service-learning.

“When we develop generosity, our mind becomes lighter and more available to insight. The act of generous giving is a means to that end. It is through giving with a kind, loving heart that we develop our capacity to let go. As we let go we become freer, lighter, and happier. The Buddha said, ‘If beings knew, as I know, the fruit of sharing gifts, they would not enjoy their use without sharing them, nor would the taint of stinginess obsess the heart and stay there. Even if it were their last bit, their last morsel of food, they would not enjoy its use without sharing it, if there were anyone to receive it.’ (Itivuttaka 18)”

Sharing our gifts makes us able to enjoy them even more. What a sweet reward!

 

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posted by on Chinese Herbal Medicine, Energy, Mental Clarity

With all the constant demands on our attention these days (both electronic and interpersonal) it can be difficult to feel focused. Forgetfulness, lack of concentration and general fogginess can become the norm when we’re not devoting time, intention and action to keeping our focus sharp and clear. Chinese medicine techniques, particularly acupuncture and qi gong, can help keep body, energy and mind flowing freely and reacting with wisdom and clarity, while remaining centered and present. Specific techniques for maintaining mental clarity can be found on the site for The YinOva Center, a very informative resource for anyone wanting to learn more about the benefits of Chinese medicine.

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posted by on Balance, Energy, Featured, Healing, Heart, Mental Clarity, Qi Gong, Stress

Acupuncture Atlanta

As I learned from my Qi Gong teacher, Paul Fraser, MAc, LicAc, the heart is our ultimate healer. It holds the key to realizing our destiny and manifesting our potential. As Paul Fraser explains on his website, “In Taoism, the belief is that the heart is a microcosm of the body, mind, soul and all of creation. Unhealthy patterns in another person can be balanced through a practitioner’s own heart. These patterns can range from the dense (the physical body) to the subtle (emotions) to the more esoteric (the soul).”

Acupuncture, Qi Gong and other opening and Qi-balancing practices enable us to look more easily and readily to our hearts for guidance and live more harmonious, connected lives.

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