Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

posted by on Balance, Energy, Featured, Nutrition, Seasons, Uncategorized

pumpkin soup

Like a squirrel piling up acorns in a tree, our bodies are looking to store up energy and health this fall in preparation for the chill of winter. The best way to take care of that natural increased appetite is with warming, nutritious foods.

According to Paul Pitchford’s great book, Healing With Whole Foods, well-chosen

foods can be used to offset the dryness of fall, which can bring dryness of the skin, nose, lips and throat. In addition, warming foods stimulate all the body’s functions, helping us warm up from the inside out.

Warming food include:

  • Almonds
  • Blackberries
  • Chocolate
  • Chicken
  • Eggs
  • Figs
  • Greens
  • Honey
  • Oats
  • Onion
  • Oranges
  • Parsnips
  • Pears
  • Pinenuts
  • Pumpkin
  • Radishes
  • Root vegetables
  • Red beans
  • Roasted foods
  • Root vegetables
  • Scallions
  • Sesame seeds
  • Spinach
  • Tomatoes (cooked)
  • Turnips

Hearty and Healthy Fall Recipes

Pumpkin Soup from about.com

Vegetarian pumpkin soup is warming and filling. Perfect for the holidays or any time.

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon margarine
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 16 oz can of pumpkin puree
  • 1 1/3 cups vegetable broth
  • 3 cups soy milk
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

In a large saucepan, cook the onion in the margarine for 3-5 minutes, until onion turns clear. Add remaining ingredients, stirring to combine. Cook over medium heat for another 10-15 minutes. Enjoy!
Makes 4 servings of vegetarian pumpkin soup.

Roasted Root Vegetables from dr.weil.com

“Root vegetables (with the exception of potatoes and carrots) are some of the most overlooked and underappreciated foodstuffs around. But these nutritional storehouses are hidden treasures worthy of your notice. Not only are they available in winter when other vegetables are hard to find, but they are also very inexpensive. Experiment with turnips, rutabagas, beets and parsnips, and learn what they have to offer in taste and versatility. Rutabaga (also known as swede) is an accidental vegetable — the result of a chance hybridization of turnips and cabbage. Like carrots, they’re low in sodium and high in vitamin C. The flavor of all root vegetables will be enhanced by selecting fresh, firm produce (preferably organically grown) and storing it carefully. Turnips and potatoes should be stored in a cool, dark place out of the refrigerator. The rest of these roots will keep well in the refrigerator for at least a week.”

Ingredients:
2 pounds root vegetables (use potatoes, carrots, parsnips, turnips, rutabagas, beets), peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
1 medium onion, peeled and cut into 1/3-inch wedges
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
Salt to taste
1 head garlic, separated into cloves and peeled
Chopped fresh herbs like rosemary, or balsamic vinegar (optional)

Instructions:
1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Place the root vegetables and onion in a roasting pan.
2. Toss the vegetables with the olive oil and salt to taste. Do not crowd the vegetables.
3. Roast the mixture for a total of 45-50 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. After 30 minutes, scatter the garlic cloves in with the vegetables. Continue stirring every 15 minutes until the vegetables are tender and evenly browned.
4. Before serving, add a sprinkling of fresh chopped herbs or balsamic vinegar, if you like for additional flavor.

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posted by on Chinese Herbal Medicine, Energy, Nutrition, Seasons

Acupuncture Atlanta

Here are some delicious cooling foods to help you balance the intense heat and activity of summer while treating your body—and taste buds—at the same time:

  • Watermelon
  • Tomatoes
  • Bananas (especially great out of the freezer)
  • Avocados
  • Lettuce
  • Asparagus
  • Apricots
  • Cantaloupe
  • Lemon
  • Grapefruit
  • Pineapple (makes anything a tropical treat)
  • Peaches
  • Oranges
  • Peppermint (makes a great, refreshing tea)
  • Bamboo
  • Bok choy
  • Broccoli
  • Chinese cabbage
  • Cilantro
  • Corn
  • Cucumber (add a few slices to water for a tasty beverage)
  • White mushrooms
  • Spinach
  • Summer squash
  • Watercress (one of the most nutritious greens you can eat)
  • Seaweed
  • Mung beans
  • Dill
  • Sprouts (easy to add to any salad or sandwich)

A few more summer eating tips:

  • Avoid overeating or large meals. Lighter meals and snacks throughout the day will keep you feeling perkier and more energetic.
  • Make sure to drink plenty of water and other fluids, even when you don’t feel particularly thirsty. Ice water with sliced citrus fruit or cucumber makes a wonderful cooling drink!
  • Stay away from heavy, fried foods and dairy whenever possible.
  • Find creative ways to combine the delicious cooling foods of summer with inventive salads and cold soups.

Got recipes and ideas of your own to share? Add them in the comments section!

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posted by on Balance, Featured, Healing, Nutrition

Acupuncture Atlanta

One extremely valuable resource to have on hand when learning about nourishing your body as a part of your whole, balanced being is Paul Pitchford’s book Healing With Whole Foods. As he explains, “Ironically, in the United States, a land of plenty-indeed
excess-many people are highly deficient in minerals as a result of our food
production and processing methods. As such, these deficiencies can lead to
degenerative diseases.

The discussion of nutrients that follows applies
to whole vegetal foods in general. However, we use wheat as a starting point
because this remarkable food, known in the traditional medicines of China and
India to strengthen the body and nurture the mind and heart, serves as a
foundation in our cultural and dietary heritage. Sadly, in the form that it is
most often eaten, wheat is stripped of its essential value.

Consider
this grain before it is milled into flour-“wheat berries.” These whole-wheat
seeds can comprise dozens of minerals and microminerals if grown in rich soil.
They can also contain immuno-protective phytonutrients as well as vitamins and
precious oils. In refining, as is done in the milling of wheat berries to obtain
“white” flour used in common pastries, donuts, pastas, and breads, the majority
of these nutrients are lost.

Every nutrient in whole wheat has an
interesting and important health story. While wheat is a common allergen,
virtually no one is allergic to sprouted wheat, which contains the same amount
of minerals, but more vitamins, per berry. (Refer to Sprouts, Chapter 40.)

To get a sense of how important nutrients in wheat can be, let’s look at
just two minerals that are lost in the refining of whole-wheat berries and
assess the impact of this loss. ” You can read more here.

Check back often for more information on healthy nutrition and plenty of delicious, nourishing recipes and ideas!

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